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Children’s Prevention and Education

Below is a list of books used by staff to provide children with an early understanding of certain issues of Domestic Violence:


Hands are Not for Hitting

By Martine Agassi

It’s never too soon for children to learn that violence is never okay, hands can do many good things, and everyone is capable of positive, loving actions.

In this bright, inviting, durable board book, simple words and full-color illustrations teach these important concepts in ways even very young children can understand.

Created in response to requests from parents, preschool teachers, and childcare providers, this book belongs everywhere young children are. Includes tips for parents and caregivers


Words are Not for Hurting

By Elizabeth Verdick

The older children get, the more words they know and can use—including hurtful words. This book teaches children that their words belong to them: They can think before they speak, then choose what to say and how to say it. It also explores positive ways to respond when others use unkind words and reinforces the importance of saying “I’m sorry.” Includes tips for parents and caregivers.


A Family That Fights

By Sharon Chesler Bernstein

Henry, Claire, and Joe hate it when their parents fight. The fighting often wakes them from a sound sleep, causing Claire and Joe to cry. The crying makes their father angrier--sometimes he even hits their mother.


The ABCs of Anger

By Ray Ali

The ABC's of Anger contains easy-to-read stories involving some aspect of the theme "anger". It provides children with an awareness of differing degrees of anger and helps them explore choices for responding when they are angry. Each story begins with a letter of the alphabet - the first letter of both an animal's name and its behavior. A picture and short story about the character follow as well as a definition of the characteristic being described. These pictures and stories may be photocopied and distributed for younger children to color and for older students to add cartoon speech balloons. The lesson on the facing page includes questions that the teacher may use to initiate discussion. It is hoped, however, that student responses and questions will lead to a more personalized dialogue with the teacher acting as a discussion facilitator. Follow-up activities conclude each lesson, and these, too, may be adapted to suit the needs of the class


A Terrible Thing Happened

By Margaret M. Holmes and Sasha J. Mudlaff

Sherman Smith saw the most terrible thing happen. At first he tried to forget about it, but soon something inside him started to bother him. He felt nervous for no reason. Sometimes his stomach hurt. He had bad dreams. And he started to feel angry and do mean things, which got him in trouble. Then he met Ms. Maple, who helped him talk about the terrible thing that he had tried to forget. Now Sherman is feeling much better. This gently told and tenderly illustrated story is for children who have witnessed any kind of violent or traumatic episode, including physical abuse, school or gang violence, accidents, homicide, suicide, and natural disasters such as floods or fire. An afterword by Sasha J. Mudlaff written for parents and other caregivers offers extensive suggestions for helping traumatized children, including a list of other sources that focus on specific events